All posts tagged: Writing 201

Poetry

deep unique beauty the seas and skies in your eyes soul expressive screens In response to Day 1: Screen, Haiku, Alliteration Smiling-looking planet Many moons orbiting In endless night blue silence Like a giant smile Saturn’s rings Ever lasting, greatest gift. In response to Day 2: Gift, Acrostic, Simile rose petals rounded tear-shaped finely smooth and veined skin, velvety-textured, soft as silk delicate as satin aromatic rose blossoms In response to Day 3: Skin, Prose Poem, Internal Rhyme Seagulls longing cry flying free on a blue sky waves caress the sand playful summer day so beautiful sun shining up so high In response to Day 4: Imperfect, Limerick, Enjambment Lonely poet living in his verses. At times he step out onto the wet streets when the rain soughs. No, he is not crying, it’s raindrops running down his face. (Short ode) In response to Day 5: Map, Ode, Metaphor In response to Day 6: Faces, Found Poetry, Chiasmus Dilapidated houses, like old men, testify to times past. And every house tells the tale of someone’s …

Writing 201: Poetry (sonnet)

Sunshine is spreading all over the sea’s expanse. It looks as if amorous play has just begun between the heavens and the sea. The scent of the water rises and seems to invite the sun to taste the beauty. The wind ruffles the sea and with its waves, it caresses the wind, immersing it in the blueness to hide it with pleasure like a golden lyre in one’s bosom. (Modern Sonnet) In response to Day 10: Pleasure, Sonnet, Apostrophe Writing 201: Poetry! Today’s form: sonnet A sonnet is normally composed of 14 lines of verse. There are several ways you can split your sonnet into stanzas (if you wish to), though the most common ones are 8-6 and 4-4-3-3. Likewise, if you decide to use rhyme in your sonnet, you can choose between various rhyming schemes, like ABAB BCBC CDCD EE, ABAB CDCD EFEF GG, or ABBA ABBA CDC DCD, among others. ~ To rhyme or not to rhyme! 🙂 Because to write poetry in English is difficult for me, even more to rhyme, my response …

Writing 201: Poetry (concrete poetry)

In response to Day 9: Cold, Found Poetry, Epistrophe/Anaphora Writing 201: Poetry! Today’s form: concrete poetry Generally speaking, any poem that’s typographically arranged to represent a specific shape (recognizable or not) is a concrete, or “shape” poem. sweet cherry blossoms every shade of pink and rose delicate petals drifting on a fresh spring breeze leafs and buds filed with raindrops (tanka poem)

Hope

winter morning cold, the waves roll, pearly white sea foam playful salt waters the bird sits alone, quietly longing in hope, waiting for his mate In response Writing 201: Poetry – Elegy and WDP: Hope Writing 201: Poetry (elegy) In response to Day 8: Flavor, Elegy, Enumeratio Writing 201: Poetry! Today’s form: elegy Originally requiring specific meters, nowadays elegies come in all shapes and sizes, though they are united by their (often melancholic) focus on loss and longing.      

Writing 201: Poetry (ballad)

The Old Neighbourhood Dilapidated houses, like old men, testify to times past. And every house tells the tale of someone’s life. The old stairways remember the heavy steps of their dwellers, and those were many. By the home fireplace they were born. In the gardens they grew. They walked the narrow alleys. New children run there now. In response to Day 7: Neighborhood, Ballad, Assonance Writing 201: Poetry! Today’s form: ballad Ballads are dramatic, emotionally-charged poems that tell a story, often about bigger-than-life characters and situations. Ballads had their roots in danced songs, and were traditionally composed using ballad meter and ballad stanzas. Their history notwithstanding, by now there are no strict rules governing the structure of ballads — they can be long, short, rhymed, or unrhymed — though it’s still common for ballads to have a refrain.

Writing 201: Poetry (found poetry)

The literary equivalent of a collage, found poetry, one of my favorite game and still is 🙂 When we were children we had notebooks with poems we made with words and images, from story-book (fairy tales) and picture-books (drawings), or from newspaper articles. Sometime I take words from my friend’s (when emotional) post/message reorder them, and present them as poems, they like it, turning a text into a poem is fun. In response to Day 6: Faces, Found Poetry, Chiasmus Writing 201: Poetry! Today’s form: found poetry A found poem is composed of words and letters you’ve collected — randomly or not — from other sources, whether printed, handwritten, or digital, and then (re)arranged into something meaningful.

Writing 201: Poetry (limerick)

Seagulls longing cry     flying free on a blue sky waves caress the sand playful summer day so beautiful     sun shining up so high In response to Day 4: Imperfect, Limerick, Enjambment Writing 201: Poetry! Today’s form: limerick Limericks are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.